I Am A Techie
WHY I HATE WINDOWS PHONE
*sigh* This is going to be hard. I’m gonna have to push all subjectivty down my throat. But, I’ve found various nitpicks that quirk my experience with Windows Phone, nonetheless.
First off, this purported multitasking. Okay, fine, it’s not multitasking, it’s “fast app switching”. But, why in the world did Microsoft make it sooo gosh darn complex? Sure, you get used to it, but the many limitations that come into play, multitasking oftentimes gets me even MORE stressed about my phone. In order to keep an app open, you must press the Windows button. To close it, the Back button. Accessing the multitasking menu involves pressing and holding the Back button, sometimes inadvertently closing an application in the process. You can only have five apps (not including Start menu) in the multitasking menu, and each browser window counts as an “app”. Did I lose you? I think I lost myself. The multitasking in Windows Phone is needlessly complicated. Also, remove the hard limit on multitasking. I don’t want to have to stress out about whether or not one of my apps had closed out because of the imposed hard limit, especially considering that a tab on Internet Explorer also counts as an application.
Second, the purported Xbox LIVE integration. Where is it? Sure, I can check my gamerscore, whether my friends are online, edit my Avatar, and play a few mobile games. But where’s the true functionality? When I first saw Microsoft marketing Windows Phone-Xbox inter-connectability, I was dreaming of the possibilities: my Windows Phone can finally replace a physical Xbox controller, kick Sony in its heinie, and interact with Kinect, all at once. It could replace the poorly contructed standard Xbox headsets that come with my system, or even the Vision Camera as a standard web cam for my Xbox. But instead, I get to edit my Avatar. And watch him do his awesome (read: horrendous) dancing.
Last but not least, while this is not about Windows Phone directly, it does impact it: Microsoft’s seemingly nonchalant attitude about promoting it. Why the heck would Microsoft expect Windows Phone to succeed on its own, especially in this increasingly competitive environment. They’ve left all the marketing to OEMs and manufacturers. When’s the last time you’ve seen a Microsoft Windows Phone commercial compared a Nokia Windows Phone commercial? Exactly. And it doesn’t stop at marketing. Microsoft doesn’t seem to be pushing anyone to make a truly extraordinary device. The Lumia 800, Titan, and Focus S are nice devices, but not outstanding. When will we see the arrival of such monstrosities such as the Samsung Galaxy Note, or even the Galaxy S2? Adding massive screens (bigger than 4.3”), dedicated gaming keyboards (like the Xperia PLAY), 3D, 16 MP cameras, even NFC, anything! Something to differentiate each Windows Phone from another, because as it stands, I have no reason to choose a generation two Windows Phone over the older variants, besides updated specs. It seems like Microsoft is waiting for success to catch up, but they’ve failed to realize that success has lapped them over and over again, and at this rate, they’ll never even see the tail end of success, except when its attached to Android or iPhones. Get your act together Microsoft. This isn’t a game anymore.

WHY I HATE WINDOWS PHONE

*sigh* This is going to be hard. I’m gonna have to push all subjectivty down my throat. But, I’ve found various nitpicks that quirk my experience with Windows Phone, nonetheless.

First off, this purported multitasking. Okay, fine, it’s not multitasking, it’s “fast app switching”. But, why in the world did Microsoft make it sooo gosh darn complex? Sure, you get used to it, but the many limitations that come into play, multitasking oftentimes gets me even MORE stressed about my phone. In order to keep an app open, you must press the Windows button. To close it, the Back button. Accessing the multitasking menu involves pressing and holding the Back button, sometimes inadvertently closing an application in the process. You can only have five apps (not including Start menu) in the multitasking menu, and each browser window counts as an “app”. Did I lose you? I think I lost myself. The multitasking in Windows Phone is needlessly complicated. Also, remove the hard limit on multitasking. I don’t want to have to stress out about whether or not one of my apps had closed out because of the imposed hard limit, especially considering that a tab on Internet Explorer also counts as an application.

Second, the purported Xbox LIVE integration. Where is it? Sure, I can check my gamerscore, whether my friends are online, edit my Avatar, and play a few mobile games. But where’s the true functionality? When I first saw Microsoft marketing Windows Phone-Xbox inter-connectability, I was dreaming of the possibilities: my Windows Phone can finally replace a physical Xbox controller, kick Sony in its heinie, and interact with Kinect, all at once. It could replace the poorly contructed standard Xbox headsets that come with my system, or even the Vision Camera as a standard web cam for my Xbox. But instead, I get to edit my Avatar. And watch him do his awesome (read: horrendous) dancing.

Last but not least, while this is not about Windows Phone directly, it does impact it: Microsoft’s seemingly nonchalant attitude about promoting it. Why the heck would Microsoft expect Windows Phone to succeed on its own, especially in this increasingly competitive environment. They’ve left all the marketing to OEMs and manufacturers. When’s the last time you’ve seen a Microsoft Windows Phone commercial compared a Nokia Windows Phone commercial? Exactly. And it doesn’t stop at marketing. Microsoft doesn’t seem to be pushing anyone to make a truly extraordinary device. The Lumia 800, Titan, and Focus S are nice devices, but not outstanding. When will we see the arrival of such monstrosities such as the Samsung Galaxy Note, or even the Galaxy S2? Adding massive screens (bigger than 4.3”), dedicated gaming keyboards (like the Xperia PLAY), 3D, 16 MP cameras, even NFC, anything! Something to differentiate each Windows Phone from another, because as it stands, I have no reason to choose a generation two Windows Phone over the older variants, besides updated specs. It seems like Microsoft is waiting for success to catch up, but they’ve failed to realize that success has lapped them over and over again, and at this rate, they’ll never even see the tail end of success, except when its attached to Android or iPhones. Get your act together Microsoft. This isn’t a game anymore.

  1. i-am-a-techie posted this